Over the past twenty years, significant strides have been made to prioritize consideration of specific environmental qualities in the design of detention and correctional settings. Research has demonstrated more and more the importance of the application of these features, including access to natural light, access to nature, acoustical control, color schemes, and many others. The correlation between exposure to these qualities and physiological and psychological outcomes has been demonstrated to work in both directions: exposure to the above elements provides positive health benefits, and a lack of exposure to these elements can lead to negative consequences. In this episode we’ll discuss the myriad environmental interventions architects and designers are implementing to improve correctional environments.

Guests

Jay Farbstein

Ph.D., FAIA

Jay has more than 30 years of professional experience and is nationally recognized for his contributions in the areas of justice facility planning and programming, with particular focus on corrections and courts. He was lead author of “Correctional Facility Planning and Design” published by Van Nostrand Reinhold. Jay has led projects for clients including the National Institute of Corrections and many federal, state and local jurisdictions nationwide. Jay is a registered architect in California and Fellow of the American Institute of Architects where he founded and co-chairs the Academy of Architecture for Justice’s research program which has led the way in fostering evidence-based design for justice facilities. Jay earned a Master of Architecture degree from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in Environmental Studies from the University of London.

Melissa Farling

FAIA, LEED AP

As a principal of Gould Evans, Melissa jointly leads the Phoenix studio with a focus on the ways in which architecture impacts people. She is well known in the profession for her passion: quantifying and applying the behavioral and physiological impacts of architecture to environments resulting in measurable outcomes. Melissa was one of the principal investigators on a National Institute of Corrections funded study to examine impacts of views of nature on stress in a jail intake area.  She was co-chair for the National AIA’s Academy of Justice for Architecture (AAJ) Research Committee for ten years and past Chair of the AAJ Leadership Group, steering the 2018 AAJ annual conference – Enlighted Justice| Advancing Treatment – focused on mental health in the justice system to address the larger systemic issues of mental health in communities.  

In an effort to create positive impact, much of Melissa’s work has focused on social justice and public projects of all sizes. She has contributed to many publications and gives frequent presentations on evidence-based design applications. She has embraced her 30+ year career as a mission to improve people’s daily lives, spirits, and well-being, particularly when it comes to complex justice, education, and health projects.

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Sarah Johnes

Art Director

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Brayan Olson

Art Director

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Who among us does not feel the shadow of fear cast by the cowardly laws of these past years? The Scoundrel Laws terrorize not only those who might commit violence, but anyone who associates with them. They reward those who denounce their brothers and sisters, sowing distrust and ill-will. They freeze our hearts and our tongues, by punishing with prison anyone who provokes, praises.
insane society has driven a few poor souls.

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